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strandbooks:

Old photos often fall out of the used books we receive, but rarely are they actually taped into the book.

This vaguely upsetting, georgeous photograph perfectly matches the tone of this haunting (and haunted) book.

You should absolutely read this book… but please be careful with it.

Underlined passage, The Book of Disquiet by Fernando Pessoa, page 64.

Source: strandbooks
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thetinhouse:

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“Usually we felt guilty and frightened, because there was something wrong with us, and we didn’t know what it was; but today we had the feeling of men who had worked.” —Denis Johnson, “Work”

Read more…

Source: thetinhouse
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wetheurban:

ART: Sky Art Illustrations by Thomas Lamadieu

Genius French artist Thomas Lamadieu has illustrated a series of scenes in the sky directly onto photographs of urban landscapes.

Read More

(via lols4lyfe)

Source: wetheurban
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myimaginarybrooklyn:

nemfrog:

The colossal elephant of Coney Island (Brooklyn). Scientific American. 1885.

Source: digitalgallery.nypl.org
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hobbesdeep:

Happy World Book Day!

Source: hobbesdeep
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kawaiisharkchan:

joobrthebaticeer:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893

Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

i love this because no matter when someones makes a “FASHIONS OF THE FUTURE” prediction it’s always like, in 50 years we will all look INSANE!!! whatever we wear now we will wear those things but COMICALLY OVERSIZED AND WEIRDER

is this jojo’s bizarre adventure

(via lols4lyfe)

Source: reapergrellsutcliff
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"On a day like today, my master William Faulkner said, “I decline to accept the end of man.” I would fall unworthy of standing in this place that was his, if I were not fully aware that the colossal tragedy he refused to recognize thirty-two years ago is now, for the first time since the beginning of humanity, nothing more than a simple scientific possibility. Faced with this awesome reality that must have seemed a mere utopia through all of human time, we, the inventors of tales, who will believe anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to engage in the creation of the opposite utopia. A new and sweeping utopia of life, where no one will be able to decide for others how they die, where love will prove true and happiness be possible, and where the races condemned to one hundred years of solitude will have, at last and forever, a second opportunity on earth."

- In the wake of Gabriel García Márquez’s death, wisdom from his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Complement with Faulkner’s iconic 1950 Nobel speech on the role o the writer as a booster of the human heart, which Márquez bows to here. (via explore-blog)
Source: explore-blog
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theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

Source: The Atlantic
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thetinhouse:



“Perhaps this is what the stories meant when they called somebody heartsick. Your heart and your stomach and your whole insides felt empty and hollow and aching.”
― Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
Photo: GABRIEL GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ 1927-2014  “Perhaps this is what the stories meant when they called somebody heartsick. Your heart and your stomach and your whole insides felt empty and hollow and aching.” ― Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
Source: thetinhouse
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guardian:

Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel laureate writer, dies aged 87

The Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, who unleashed the worldwide boom in Spanish literature with his novel 100 Years of Solitude, has died at the age of 87, a person close to the family has said. García Márquez had been admitted to hospital in Mexico City on 3 April with pneumonia. Full story

Pictured: Gabriel García Márquez at his house in Mexico City, 2010. Photograph: Miguel Tovar/AP

(via lols4lyfe)

Source: theguardian.com
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fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Snowdrop & other tales' by the Brothers Grimm; illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Published 1920 by E.P. Dutton & Company, New York.

See the complete book here.

(via lols4lyfe)

Source: fuckyeahvintageillustration